Wallpaper* Handmade

For the last seven years, Wallpaper* has acted as client, patron and creative director, commissioning the world's finest artists, designers, craftsmen and manufacturers to collaborate on one-of-a-kind pieces. This year we invite you to check in to Hotel Wallpaper* for our annual Handmade 2016 showcase held in Milan during Salone. Working with the theme of travel and hospitality, Wallpaper* has turned to the design world's sharpest creative minds to envision the ultimate home away from home for the design-savvy traveller. Now, you can buy some of these unique wonders right here.

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Tea and coffee glassware

by Ichendorf Milano

€82,00

Taking inspiration from the Japanese tea ceremony, Jenkins&Uhnger chose to focus on the ritual of decanting tea or coffee into a cup. Its transparent glass vessel, manufactured by Ichendorf Milano, incorporates negative space between an inner and outer layer, placing emphasis on the pouring itself and keeping the exterior cool to the touch. Photography: Joel Stans

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'Fire' match kit

by Fort Standard

€105,00

A spin-off of Fort Standard's 'Life is Precious Survival Kit', designed for the 2013 Salone Del Mobile, 'Fire' was produced in response to popular demand. Crafted from a solid bar of brass, the match canister is engraved with the words “Fire - Light & Warmth – Strike on bottom”, directing users to the roughened bottom of the item, which acts as the striker.

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Shoe Tree

by Joined + Jointed

€5.500,00

‘Storing shoes is always somewhat challenging in terms of space and aesthetic,’ says footwear designer Beatrix Ong. ‘I wanted to create a piece that is both storage and display,’ she explains of her collaboration with Samuel Chan’s furniture collective Joined + Jointed. ‘Calling it “Shoe Tree” hints at the fact that you can grow it if you wish.’ The modular design merges a totem pole and shoebox stack, handcrafted from American black walnut with marquetry finger joints. Photography: Paul Zak

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Shoe Box

by Joined + Jointed

€250,00

‘Storing shoes is always somewhat challenging in terms of space and aesthetic,’ says footwear designer Beatrix Ong. ‘I wanted to create a piece that is both storage and display,’ she explains of her collaboration with Samuel Chan’s furniture collective Joined + Jointed. ‘Calling it “Shoe Tree” hints at the fact that you can grow it if you wish.’ The modular design merges a totem pole and shoebox stack, handcrafted from American black walnut with marquetry finger joints.

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Vase set

by Linck Ceramics

€10.300,00

Fashion designer Roksanda Ilincic has put her own spin on five handmade ceramic vessels designed by Margrit Linck between the 1940s and 1960s. Previously produced in just a white or black glaze, the vases now feature Ilincic’s signature bold use of colour. The horizontal banding and stripes were created using special decals, a kind of transfer fired directly onto the glaze. Photography: Paul Zak

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'S222' bowl

by Linck Ceramics

€1.590,00

Fashion designer Roksanda Ilincic has put her own spin on five handmade ceramic vessels designed by Margrit Linck between the 1940s and 1960s. Previously produced in just a white or black glaze, the vases now feature Ilincic’s signature bold use of colour. The horizontal banding and stripes were created using special decals, a kind of transfer fired directly onto the glaze. Photography: Paul Zak

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'S246' bowl

by Linck Ceramics

€2.840,00

Fashion designer Roksanda Ilincic has put her own spin on five handmade ceramic vessels designed by Margrit Linck between the 1940s and 1960s. Previously produced in just a white or black glaze, the vases now feature Ilincic’s signature bold use of colour. The horizontal banding and stripes were created using special decals, a kind of transfer fired directly onto the glaze. Photography: Paul Zak

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'V16/6' vase

by Linck Ceramics

€1.795,00

Fashion designer Roksanda Ilincic has put her own spin on five handmade ceramic vessels designed by Margrit Linck between the 1940s and 1960s. Previously produced in just a white or black glaze, the vases now feature Ilincic’s signature bold use of colour. The horizontal banding and stripes were created using special decals, a kind of transfer fired directly onto the glaze. Photography: Paul Zak

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'V36' vase

by Linck Ceramics

€2.395,00

Fashion designer Roksanda Ilincic has put her own spin on five handmade ceramic vessels designed by Margrit Linck between the 1940s and 1960s. Previously produced in just a white or black glaze, the vases now feature Ilincic’s signature bold use of colour. The horizontal banding and stripes were created using special decals, a kind of transfer fired directly onto the glaze. Photography: Paul Zak

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'V77/1' vase

by Linck Ceramics

€1.665,00

Fashion designer Roksanda Ilincic has put her own spin on five handmade ceramic vessels designed by Margrit Linck between the 1940s and 1960s. Previously produced in just a white or black glaze, the vases now feature Ilincic’s signature bold use of colour. The horizontal banding and stripes were created using special decals, a kind of transfer fired directly onto the glaze. Photography: Paul Zak

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Matches vessels 1

by NasonMoretti

€500,00

Taking inspiration from the cylindrical matchboxes they were designed to hold, Will Yates-Johnson’s vessels were made in collaboration with Italian glass manufacturer NasonMoretti, which gave the designer access to its archive of colours and moulds. Produced in ‘Aviation Blue’, the vessels were formed by fusing two separately blown pieces, with the ribbed parts created using a technique called rigadin ritorto. Photography: Matteo Piazza

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Matches vessels 2

by NasonMoretti

€400,00

Taking inspiration from the cylindrical matchboxes they were designed to hold, Will Yates-Johnson’s vessels were made in collaboration with Italian glass manufacturer NasonMoretti, which gave the designer access to its archive of colours and moulds. Produced in ‘Aviation Blue’, the vessels were formed by fusing two separately blown pieces, with the ribbed parts created using a technique called rigadin ritorto. Photography: Matteo Piazza

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